Speaker Date Topic
John Freeman Aug 11, 2020
How Dry I Ain’t: Prohibition – the Ignoble Experiment that Failed
How Dry I Ain’t: Prohibition – the Ignoble Experiment that Failed

This year we celebrate the centennial of the beginning of the Volstead Act (1920 – 1933), the enforcement legislation of the 18 th Amendment. The Prohibition movement had its origins in the Northeast and Midwest, with very little enthusiasm in the West, and particularly in the San Francisco Bay Area. But it was the “Law of the Land,” and we had to obey its restrictions. The 13 years of Prohibition have been sensationalized, primarily because of gang violence and dramatic law enforcement methods in big cities and smaller communities in other regions of the nation. This presentation will focus on the less dramatic activities of citizens in our area, who found ways to circumvent what President Herbert Hoover called the “noble experiment” with a much more relaxed attitude.

Julia Flynn Siler Aug 25, 2020
"The White Devil's Daughters: The Women Who Fought Slavery in San Francisco's Chinatown."

During the first hundred years of Chinese immigration--from 1848 to 1943--San Francisco was home to a shockingly extensive underground slave trade in Asian women, who were exploited as prostitutes and indentured servants. Julia examines this little-known chapter in our history--and gives us a vivid portrait of the safe house to which enslaved women escaped.  Accompanied by historical photos from the book, she'll explore the Marin settings and people in her nonfiction book.

Annette Venables Sep 08, 2020
Tribe Rising India

Elizabeth Suzuki is Program Chair for this event. 

Debbie Tozier Sep 22, 2020
Exploring Whiteness
Exploring Whiteness

Civil Rights Advocate Debbie Tozier will present Exploring Whiteness. She will discuss what it means to have a white racial identity. What are our implicit biases and how do we learn to recognize them in our daily interactions? Why is it so hard for white people to talk about racism? How do we have these conversations and still center black, indigenous and people of color in the movement for racial justice?

Oak Dowling Oct 06, 2020
Avoiding Scams-Including Covid, Fraud, and Identity Theft
Avoiding Scams-Including Covid, Fraud, and Identity Theft

Financial Scams/Fraud/ID Theft 

Oak will enlighten and educate us on how to protect older adults and all ages against common financial scams. A 2018 study asserts that financial elder abuse costs $36.5 billion annually. In Marin County alone, financial abuse cases make up 32% of all referrals to Adult Protective Services. Nationwide it’s estimated that only 1 in 10 cases is reported.

Rita Abrams Oct 20, 2020
The Mill Valley Song Turns 50! - Rita Abrams Shares Her Story.
The Mill Valley Song Turns 50! - Rita Abrams Shares Her Story.
Two-time Emmy Award winner Rita Abrams describes how her smallest musical creation became the biggest legacy of her musical career. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-YaWE0zu-c

Dick Spotswood Nov 03, 2020
We’ve Voted. Now What? - Election Aftermath
We’ve Voted. Now What? - Election Aftermath

Dick Spotswood will discuss what we can expect in the next few months as votes are counted, returns disputed and the results announced.

Helen Zia Nov 17, 2020
Last Boat out of Shanghai and What that Great Escape Means for Today.
Last Boat out of Shanghai and What that Great Escape Means for Today.
Bay Area author Helen Zia discusses her latest book " Last Boat Out of Shanghai: The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Fled Mao’s Revolution" , a deeply moving chronicle of the extraordinary ordeals and exodus of four ordinary Chinese in a world torn by war and fractured by ideology. Their experiences in fleeing China and their struggles to survive as exiles and refugees in the US, Hong Kong, Taiwan and wherever the diaspora would take them are mirrored by an untold exodus of millions of others then and throughout human migrations from catastrophe, and will likely provide insights to people of Hong Kong and other hot spots today. Marin's Amy Tan, author of "The Joy Luck Club" noted: “Zia’s portraits are compassionate and heartbreaking, and they are, ultimately, the universal story of many families who leave their homeland as refugees and find less-than-welcoming circumstances on the other side. I read with a personal hunger...”
Her book was one NPR's "Best books of the year" and finalist for a  national PEN America book award. As.the San Francisco Chronicle review wrote: "a fascinating read as a missing chapter of modern history finally coming to light. What makes the Shanghai story unique is that the real human cost of the massive exodus has remained a mystery. Official records, if any, are suppressed, and research in this area has been sketchy. " Last Boat Out of Shanghai: The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Fled Mao’s Revolution"  . . . fills a gap in our collective memory.